EFFECTIVENESS & PROOF

Yes, hypochlorous acid is very effective at removing biofilm and preventing formation. Click here to visit research on biofilm.

Over 300 research articles have been published covering nearly every application. Click here to visit the research database organized by industry.

Chlorine is an extremely effective disinfectant for inactivating bacteria. A study conducted during the 1940s investigated the inactivation levels as a function of time for E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, and Shigella dysenteriae (Butterfield et al., 1943). Study results indicated that HOCl is more effective than OCl- (aka. chlorine bleach) for inactivation of these bacteria. These results have been confirmed by several researchers that concluded that HOCl is 70 to 80 times more effective than OCl- for inactivating bacteria (Culp/Wesner/Culp, 1986). Since 1986, there have been hundreds of publications confirming the superiority of HOCl over OCl- (click here to visit research database). HOCl may be more effective than OCl- for two reasons, this first is because it holds a neutral charge and therefore can easily penetrate the negatively charged cell walls of bacteria. The second reason is because HOCl has a much higher oxidation potential than OCl-.

Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) has been researched and proven to be effective against many viruses Click here to visit research on viruses .

Hypochlorous acid is measured with the same standard test strips that measure free chlorine in a pool. The test strips will turn a different shade of purple to indicate the concentration between 10 and 200 ppm. For higher concentrations, the solution being tested can be diluted. (Example: A 1000 ppm solution could be diluted at a 1:10 ratio. A test strip would then read 100 ppm indicating the original solution was 1000 ppm.)

Yes, probably the most research on hypochlorous acid has been done on the microbial pathogens Listeria, Salmonella, and E. coli. Click here to visit the research database organized by microbial pathogen.

ypochlorous acid is highly effective against MRSA. Since Clostridium specias are difficult to culture in the lab, Bacillus species, which are also spore forming bacteria and more difficult to kill, are used instead. Click here to see the research on Bacillus .

Yes, there are two published studies on Norovirus. Click here to see the research on Norovirus.

The most researched applications have been in the food industry using hypochlorous acid for direct food sanitation and for sanitation of food contact surfaces. Other researched applications have been in healthcare for disinfection and sterilization of equipment, for wound care, and for general sanitation of healthcare facilities against MRSA and spore forming organisms. Additionally, research has been done in the industry of livestock, agriculture, and for water treatment and disinfection. Click here to visit the research database organized by industry.

The concentration that should be used depends on the application. Sanitizing food such as fruits & vegetables and fish & seafood is highly effective at 20-30 ppm however the FDA allows concentrations to be used as high as 60 ppm without requiring a post rinse. Sanitizing food contact surfaces is also effective at 20-30 ppm however concentrations as high as 200 ppm are allowed by the FDA. Water disinfection is effective at 1-2 ppm however the EPA allows up to 4 ppm. When deciding what concentration to use, it is best to refer to the research. Over 300 research articles have been published covering nearly every application. Click here to visit the research database organized by industry.

EFFECTIVENESS & PROOF

Yes, hypochlorous acid is very effective at removing biofilm and preventing formation. Click here to visit research on biofilm.

Over 300 research articles have been published covering nearly every application. Click here to visit the research database organized by industry.

Chlorine is an extremely effective disinfectant for inactivating bacteria. A study conducted during the 1940s investigated the inactivation levels as a function of time for E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, and Shigella dysenteriae (Butterfield et al., 1943). Study results indicated that HOCl is more effective than OCl- (aka. chlorine bleach) for inactivation of these bacteria. These results have been confirmed by several researchers that concluded that HOCl is 70 to 80 times more effective than OCl- for inactivating bacteria (Culp/Wesner/Culp, 1986). Since 1986, there have been hundreds of publications confirming the superiority of HOCl over OCl- (click here to visit research database). HOCl may be more effective than OCl- for two reasons, this first is because it holds a neutral charge and therefore can easily penetrate the negatively charged cell walls of bacteria. The second reason is because HOCl has a much higher oxidation potential than OCl-.

Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) has been researched and proven to be effective against many viruses Click here to visit research on viruses .

Hypochlorous acid is measured with the same standard test strips that measure free chlorine in a pool. The test strips will turn a different shade of purple to indicate the concentration between 10 and 200 ppm. For higher concentrations, the solution being tested can be diluted. (Example: A 1000 ppm solution could be diluted at a 1:10 ratio. A test strip would then read 100 ppm indicating the original solution was 1000 ppm.)

Yes, probably the most research on hypochlorous acid has been done on the microbial pathogens Listeria, Salmonella, and E. coli. Click here to visit the research database organized by microbial pathogen.

ypochlorous acid is highly effective against MRSA. Since Clostridium specias are difficult to culture in the lab, Bacillus species, which are also spore forming bacteria and more difficult to kill, are used instead. Click here to see the research on Bacillus .

Yes, there are two published studies on Norovirus. Click here to see the research on Norovirus.

The most researched applications have been in the food industry using hypochlorous acid for direct food sanitation and for sanitation of food contact surfaces. Other researched applications have been in healthcare for disinfection and sterilization of equipment, for wound care, and for general sanitation of healthcare facilities against MRSA and spore forming organisms. Additionally, research has been done in the industry of livestock, agriculture, and for water treatment and disinfection. Click here to visit the research database organized by industry.

The concentration that should be used depends on the application. Sanitizing food such as fruits & vegetables and fish & seafood is highly effective at 20-30 ppm however the FDA allows concentrations to be used as high as 60 ppm without requiring a post rinse. Sanitizing food contact surfaces is also effective at 20-30 ppm however concentrations as high as 200 ppm are allowed by the FDA. Water disinfection is effective at 1-2 ppm however the EPA allows up to 4 ppm. When deciding what concentration to use, it is best to refer to the research. Over 300 research articles have been published covering nearly every application. Click here to visit the research database organized by industry.